Tag Archives: separation of church and state

He’s Not the Pastor of the United States, He’s the President of the United States

Can I get an Amen?

Fredrick D Haynes III certainly knows how to move a crowd. It is hopeful that a leader like him can talk sense and ask questions in what seems like ever shifting religious zeal in the evangelical Christian movement in this country. I have no idea what the specifics of Pastor Haynes theology, he didn’t address that aspect on this video.

This video is about a response and requests for collaboration about responses, to Obama’s statement on gay marriage. I don’t know if the pastor believe homosexuality is a choice relating to morality or not, he did a great job of framing and speaking about the difference between church and state laws, and makes it clear that they should have little directly to do with personal beliefs. He makes the distinction that the Bible is not the founding document of this country, the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution are. He made these comments as a leader in a protestant movement that is not known for its LGBT support, and in direct opposition to prominent Baptist leaders.

Who knows? Maybe I would find the actual theology of that church offensive. It doesn’t matter when we have the clear separation of church and state – we can all find our own niche. The Constitution demands that those niches be treated equally. Thanks Pastor Haynes for pointing this out in a way probably only you can.

The photo at the top is of Rev. Billy and the Church of Stop Shopping. He is with his choir. They have nothing to do with Fredrick D Haynes III or really anything else about this post – other than the fact that he can get people excited and understand some basic American values and progressive principles.

Advertisements
Tagged , , ,

Nation or Salvation?

Saving souls and governing democratically don’t mix – at least both cannot exist as a top priority in one’s mind as a governing leader. Either saving souls is more important or the principles of democracy are, because the concept of “salvation” in the Christian church is not a democratic notion. Salvation means submitting to not only God, but to the long list of rules that salvation centered religions have pushed as a requirement for salvation.

Mormonism is the center of curiosity today because it is Mitt Romney’s religion and he just semi-officially became “the contender” for President on behalf of the Republican party. If you’re not in Utah, Mormons aren’t very evident in daily American life, they aren’t as numerous, loud, or show stealing as evangelicals tend to be. If we are going to be governed by a man who believes as Mormons do, we have a need to know what Mormons believe. Continue reading

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , ,

The Hoarding Horde

Pastor Rick Warren, the Southern Baptist mega church minister, was interviewed by ABC. His interview was parsed into bite sized pieces and can be found all over the internet. He admitted that while there are lots of Bible passages in which Jesus implores us to help the poor, he says, “I do not believe in wealth redistribution, I believe in wealth creation.” He offers little spiritual support for this, it sounds more like a Republican talking point.

Rick Warren went on the news and was able to hit quite a few Republican talking points, I’m left wondering why he gets to do that and is his appearance an “in-kind” donation that serves as a commercial for the Republican party? Here’s a bit where he conflates God’s approval with our chosen wars and protecting the family,

(INTERVIEWER/TAPPER): When troops come to you, having seen, maybe even done horrifying things, how do you counsel them? How do you say this is how you reconcile war and Christ? Continue reading

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , ,

Who Says Who is a Christian?

The President made a connection between his personal beliefs as a Christian and his executive decisions last week at the National Prayer Breakfast. That part of his speech has enraged some conservative Christian voters, who have made some pretty vitriolic statements in response. The offensive piece of prose:

And when I talk about shared responsibility, it’s because I genuinely believe that in a time when many folks are struggling, at a time when we have enormous deficits, it’s hard for me to ask seniors on a fixed income, or young people with student loans, or middle-class families who can barely pay the bills to shoulder the burden alone. And I think to myself, if I’m willing to give something up as somebody who’s been extraordinarily blessed, and give up some of the tax breaks that I enjoy, I actually think that’s going to make economic sense.

But for me as a Christian, it also coincides with Jesus’s teaching that “for unto whom much is given, much shall be required.” It mirrors the Islamic belief that those who’ve been blessed have an obligation to use those blessings to help others, or the Jewish doctrine of moderation and consideration for others. Continue reading

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,